Criminal Case Results: Assault

Houston Criminal Lawyer Jack Carroll’s Assault Case Results

  • Aggravated Assault-Deadly Weapon: Case Dismissed – CZE# 07430770 – 248th
  • Assault-Bodily Injury: Not Guilty – CZE# 9746430 CT 14
  • Assault-Bodily Injury: Case Dismissed – CZE# 17840170 CT 13 Before Jury Selection
  • Assault-Bodily Injury: Case Dismissed – CZE# 12612290 CT 13 Jury Trial
  • Aggravated Assault-Deadly Weapon: Deferred Adjudication – CZE# 08539730 182nd – Day of Trial
  • Assault: Case Dismissed – CZE# 12065400 CT 9 Set For Jury Trial
  • Aggravated Assault: Case Dismissed – 1244b: CZE# 06594140 CT 337th
  • Aggravated Assault: Case Dismissed – CZE# 12397850 CT 184th
  • Assault-Bodily Injury: Case Dismissed – CZE# 15814950 CT 5
  • Aggravated Assault-Deadly Weapon: Case Dismissed – CZE# 09037040 248th – Dismissed day of Jury Trial
  • Aggravated Assault-Deadly Weapon: Case Dismissed – CZE# 97219330 Moved to CT 8
  • Assault-Bodily Injury: Case Dismissed – CZE# 95548840 CT 13
  • Assault-Bodily Injury: Case Dismissed – CZE# 17068070 CT 12
  • Aggravated Assault-Deadly Weapon: Case Dismissed – CZE# 07170300 – 262nd
  • Aggravated Assault-Deadly Weapon: Case Dismissed – CZE# 07552550 – 230th – Set for Jury Trial
  • Aggravated Assault-Deadly Weapon: Case Dismissed – CZE# 10700910 Dist CT 176th – Dismissed Before Jury Trial
  • Aggravated Assault-Deadly Weapon: Deferred Adjudication – CZE# 12397850 184th  – Day of Jury Trial

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ASSAULT: TEXAS PENAL CODE CHAPTER 22 22.01

(a) A person commits an offense if the person:

(1) Intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly causes bodily injury to another, including the person’s spouse;

(2) Intentionally or knowingly threatens another with imminent bodily injury, including the person’s spouse; or

(3) Intentionally or knowingly causes physical contact with another when the person knows or should have reasonably known that the other will regard the contact as offensive or provocative.

PROTECTIVE ORDERS
In the application for a protective order, the court shall find;
(a) At the close of a hearing on an application for a protective order, the court shall find whether:
(1) Family violence has occurred: and
(2) Family violence is likely to occur in the future.
(b) If the court finds that family violence has occurred and that the family violence is likely to occur in the future, the court:
(1)shall render a protective order as provided by 85.022 …… applying to a person who committed family violence; and may order the person to complete a battering intervention and prevention program and counsel with a social worker and may prohibit the person found to have committed family violence from committing family violence and communicating with the person in a threatening or harassing manner or a threat made through any person to a person protected by an order, or going near the residence or place of employment or business of a person protected by an order, except through the person’s lawyer. And the order will specially delineate the minimum distance from the location. And a license to carry a firearm can be suspended.
(2) May render a protective order as provided 85.021…. applying to both parties that are in the best interest of the person protected by the order or member of the family or household of the person protected by the order. The court may prohibit any party from removing a child who is a member of the family or household from the possession of a person named in the order
(c) A protective order that requires the first applicant to do or refrain from doing an act shall include a finding that the first applicant has committed family violence and is likely to commit family violence in the future.

PENALTIES: Violating a protective order is very serious because it is disobeying a direct order from the judge, and it is a misdemeanor on the first offense and there are additional penalties and conditions not normally given in other misdemeanor cases. The police can arrest you without a warrant, simply by a witness statement that you went near, or threatened a person protected and you can be held in jail without bail/bond. The orders can last from 90 days up to two years. If you are sent to prison or the county jail it can last up to one year after you get out. A conviction for a violation of a protective order is a Class A misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine up to $4000. If you have 2 or more previous convictions for a violation, it is a 3rd degree felony punishable by up to 10 years TDC and a $10,000 fine, and you may not be able to own a gun for up to 5 years after your probation or sentence ends.


Houston Criminal Defense Lawyer Jack Carroll’s Case Results